News

CANS Meeting: Nicola Jones

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience @ LJMU. Speaker: Nicola Jones

Nicola’s interests include learning, memory and attention, and how these processes are represented behaviourally and at a neural level in both typical and atypical populations. Her PhD research was focused on investigating the effects of glucoregulation on memory and face recognition in older adults.

CANS Meeting: Samatha Brooks

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience research group meeting

Dr Samantha Brooks

The rising trend of internationally competitive research into the cognitive control of impulsivity reflects the importance of examining the neural mechanisms of impulse control.  The rising trend might be due to impulse control deficits contributing substantially to the increase in serious mental and physical disorders that are prevalent globally. Impulse control, the tendency to prevent actions that are harmful to self and others, is fostered by prefrontal cortex executive functions – such as working memory (WM) – interacting with limbic processes.  This interaction is referred to in a growing body of publications by terms like cognitive control, cognitive inhibition, affect regulation, self-regulation, top-down control, and cognitive–emotion interaction. Against this background, I describe the novel international approaches my collaborators and I have taken to tackle this important issue, that has led to over 70 publications examining cognitive control from the perspective of anorexia nervosa through to substance use disorder.

Neurocourses: Limbic Brain Anatomy Course

LIMBIC BRAIN ANATOMY COURSE
Thurs 29th – Fri 30th November 2018, Birkbeck, University of London

Neuroanatomy for psychiatry, neurology, neurosurgery and neuroscience

https://www.neurocourses.com/courses/the-limbic-brain-anatomy-course-2-day/

This exciting and popular 2-day course focuses on the the anatomy of the “limbic” brain including the topography and functional anatomy of the limbic lobe, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum – and clearly explains notoriously confusing topics such as the basal forebrain, septal area, habenula, olfactory areas, extended amygdala.

Mean delegate feedback: 4.9 / 5.0

When: Thurs 29th – Fri 30th November
Where: Birkbeck, University of London*
Price: £295

Register on-line:
https://www.neurocourses.com/book/

Suitable for basic, clinical and imaging neuroscientists (structural and functional MRI) and is also very popular with NHS consultants and junior doctors in specialties such as neurology, psychiatry, radiology and neurosurgery.

Course Directors
Dr Paul Johns, BSc BM MSc FAcadMEd FRCPath
Consultant neuropathologist / senior lecturer in neuroanatomy
Author of Clinical Neuroscience: An Illustrated Colour Text
See course photos and delegate reviews on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Neurocourses
*Please note that Neurocourses UK is not affiliated to Birkbeck, University of London.

 

Dr. Gemma Northam, PhD
Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychiatry Section
Developmental Neurosciences Programme
UCL Institute of Child Health
30 Guilford Street London WC1N 1EH

MerseyLune Seminar: We only search efficiently for two targets when there is no alternative

Prof. Kyle Cave   University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA

We are very good at searching for a visual object in a complex scene when we know its colour, because we can quickly guide our eyes and our attention to locations in the scene that have that colour. When we search for either of two different targets, however, we do not always search efficiently, and thus took longer to find the target. In a series of experiments, we found that subjects searching for two different colours often fixated colours that were very different from either target. This dual-target cost in search performance increases is the similarity between the two target colours increases (split-target cost). There is a similar decrease in search efficiency if subjects hold one colour in visual working memory while searching for another colour (working-memory cost). These costs might reflect fundamental limitations in our abilities to store multiple targets in memory or to use them to guide search. However, in a somewhat different search task with similar stimuli, subjects searched efficiently for two different colours, with relatively few fixations to colours that were dissimilar to both targets. Apparently the attentional system is capable of efficient dual-target search, but subjects sometimes do not employ this capability if there is an alternative way to perform the task, even though this alternative results in a much slower and less efficient search. We hope that these results will lead to ways to improve visual search performance.

 

Organised by: Dr. Nicola Jones & Prof. Nicholas Donnelly

Neurocourses: Human Brain Anatomy Course

Human Brain Anatomy Course
14th – 16th November 2018
Birkbeck, University of London, UK
https://www.neurocourses.com/courses/human-brain-anatomy-course-3-day/

Places available NOW…

A comprehensive introduction to structural and functional neuroanatomy

This highly popular three-day course has been running since 2007 and provides a comprehensive introduction to structural, functional and radiological brain anatomy, providing delegates with a solid, three-dimensional understanding of the human brain and its relationship to cross-sectional (MRI) anatomy.

Mean delegate feedback: 4.9 / 5.0

When: 14th – 16th November 2018
Where: Birkbeck, University of London*
Price: £395

This course is suitable for anyone with an interest in structural and functional brain anatomy and is widely attended by delegates at all levels from undergraduate student to professor.

Please note: due to the smaller venue places are strictly limited.

Course Directors
Dr Paul Johns, BSc BM MSc FAcadMEd FRCPath
Consultant neuropathologist / senior lecturer in neuroanatomy
Author of Clinical Neuroscience: An Illustrated Colour Text
See course photos and delegate reviews on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Neurocourses
*Please note that Neurocourses UK is not affiliated to Birkbeck, University of London.

 

Dr. Gemma Northam, PhD
Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychiatry Section
Developmental Neurosciences Programme
UCL Institute of Child Health
30 Guilford Street London WC1N 1EH